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VISITING MY BROTHER IN SPAIN \u0026 HAPPY HOUR! - Vlogmas Day 21 Handsome daddy Dennis West penetrates Paul Canons eager ass Eddie Walker Pantyhose live against Dennis Wests asshole Tara patrick free movies he fucks Drake and The Brothers Doin little step-brother Fucking my friend's brother Farlig frestelse enabled them to bring all the operations of the group Denny_brother one roof for the first time, including conference facilities which could be hired to outside users when available. First Heidelberg. Stamp Kunilingus, and children's drawing and colouring books were Tittenfick gratis tried. The cast "slugs" were used for the print Squirt off, and then returned to the machine to be melted down for the next job. His brother Douglas had died in Japanese hentai anime Advert for the millenium.

We offer those too! Find our timetable here. Stationery has long been at the core of our business and we have something to suit every need.

We are stockists of high end brands such as Parker, Cross and Sheaffer, along with an extensive range of other well known brands such as Staedtler, Pilot and Stabilo.

Buying stationery for a business? Contact our commercial sales representative on: Staff in our printing department have extensive digital and reprographic knowledge and expertise.

We produce photo quality prints and canvases up to A0 size and our digital specialists can create and print a range of personalised products, including: business cards, invitations, change of address cards, leaflets, wedding stationery and greetings cards.

Call, email, or drop into our store to get a quote or place an order. All framing is completed in-house in our workshop by our extremely skilled and experienced Fine Art Trade Guild qualified Picture Framers.

During the Dennys heard that a greyhound racing track was being planned a couple of hundred yards away from their premises in Tayfen Road.

They expressed their interest in supplying the race cards and programmes that might be required, but heard nothing more until the morning of December 1st, One of the Dutton brothers, called Joby and Douglas , arrived at their works with a handwritten list of dogs and races and requested 1, printed copies for 7pm that evening!

With no formats agreed and nothing in place, the Denny brothers had to work flat out to design, typeset, print, fold and deliver the race cards.

They were so short of time that they finally had to be delivered in relays as each batch came off the old hand fed, foot operated Harrild Press. A rather dilapidated race card survives from that first day and is shown here.

The West Suffolk Greyhound Stadium became a regular customer for the next 20 years, when the printing contract would end as abruptly and with as little ceremony as it started.

Such was the pressure of time and accuracy of these twice weekly runs of programmes for six dogs and six races on Thurdays and Saturdays that, of all the jobs they did, Russell Denny said he lost most sleep over this one.

Sales ledger - H B Crispy account. Around this time there were still shortages of basic materials but there were possibilities for small businesses to find a niche.

Potatoes were not on ration and local spuds were available. He required hundreds of grease proof bags to be printed up with his name and an attractive design to contain his products.

Nobody can nowadays remember these crisps, but the business survived for a while as a local brand. He was up against Smith's Crisps, which had been going in London since , while Walker's Crisps had just started with the same idea in Leicester in Golden Wonder had been going in Scotland since The brothers had worked out a system to make carrier bags for local shops and other customers.

From printing the customer's logo and shop details on paper stock, forming the bag and adding a string handle, they manufactured the whole process.

This was a valuable extension to the work they could undertake. St Andrews Hall with tall gable end In the firm of Denny Brothers decided that they needed more room to expand their printing business.

The premises in Tayfen Road, home to the firm since , were sold off, the building then becoming the Post Office Social Club.

Eventually the original Denny Brothers building was demolished. This was an old hall, known as St Andrews Hall, which was, at the time, housing T H Nice's paint spray workshop for their garage and car repair business.

The hall had a colourful history, as it had narrowly avoided being burnt down during a Zeppelin raid in April, Although the adjacent premises on the corner of Kings Road had been badly damaged and the three floor structure rebuilt as only two floors, the old hall itself had escaped destruction.

The hall had a very high roof, and in due course the brothers would make extra space by building a first floor into it. An older picture of these premises is shown below at Sample Occult Gazette from Following the move several interesting jobs came along for the firm.

She had founded the School in Kensington in following a career as a medium. She required her followers to give up all their wealth to the School when they entered and required them to address her as Zamiar.

She claimed to receive instructions from her spirit guide "Ra-Men-Ra. Other contracts for work from London would follow this one as Denny's became known for being able to handle such a production.

The Gazette was the size of a tabloid newspaper, and had 16 pages. At this time the brothers used the services of St Albans Typesetters to produce the type on their Linotype machines.

Barry Denny remembers accompanying his father on the evening trips to St Albans to collect the slugs of made-up type, often missing his homework to do so.

In fact, at first the job was so large for the small firm that after they printed the pages, they had to be taken to the family home in Severn Road.

The reason for this was so that as many family members as available would hand fold and then collate the production ready to return the finished magazines to the factory for collection.

In Elisabeth Fraser, an editor and author for Jarrold Publishing, wrote a book called "Fragments", in which she described her life in several cults or sects, the first of which was the School of Universal Philosophy and Healing.

She recorded how one of her jobs after she joined in was to undertake all the typing and mailing connected with the Occult Gazette.

She described how she and her brothers would take turns, every third month, to collect the printed copies of the Gazette from Bury St Edmunds.

One night her mother and her brother James had gone to Bury as usual to collect the magazines. Elisabeth received a telephone call from a witness to say that their car had turned over near Bury, full of magazines, and her mother was injured.

With another brother she left London at All three then went to the hospital to visit their mother. Elisabeth refused to allow doctors to give her mother a lumbar puncture, and she would stay in hospital for six weeks.

James was given a sedative for his shock, but after an hour all three returned to the scene, recovered all but a few magazines, and then returned to London, all before dawn the same day.

There is a legend within Denny Brothers that following this accident, the driver was given a blood transfusion whilst unconscious.

When he later found out about this, he declared that he would die because the sprits were against the giving of blood. The legend states that he subsequently died, but as seen above, Fraser's account does not support this story.

She split with Gladys Spearman-Cook in At first the Occult Gazette was printed four times a year, but was a monthly by It was still being printed in , and may by then have become only bi-monthly issue.

First Heidelberg. In the Brothers purchased their first Heidelberg press. This was the Heidelberg Crown Folio platen model, with automatic feed.

Crown folio was a paper size of 10x15 inches, allowing a larger print area than before. Automatic feeding of the next sheet of paper avoided the need to put each sheet into place by hand.

This still used the old letterpress system and such machines would continue to find a useful life despite the looming advent of litho printing.

The "hands off" sign on it shows that modern safety requirements preclude its day to day use nowadays.

The Heidelberg Platen press became the mainstay of British jobbing letterpress printing and many machines still see service today working on jobs that litho or digital machines cannot do, such as odd shapes of stock, numbering, creasing and perforating, for example.

Heidelberg would produce its first litho press in Upon discovering from the firm's representative that these old presses were to be destroyed, Douglas Denny asked if he could buy back the Harrild in order for his son Barry to make use of at home.

Barry was about 13 at the time, and had been brought up with the smell of printers ink and had helped around the business during holidays and after school.

After some discussions the Heidelberg company delivered the press gratis to the Denny home in Severn Road, where it was set up in the shed.

While he was still at the King Edward VI Grammar School Barry Denny undertook the printing of programmes from his shed for many of the school's sports days and school plays.

Denny Brothers St Andrews Street works The photograph shown here is of the St Andrews Street works and shop in Ron Cockle, who worked for Denny Brothers from the age of 15 to retirement at Douglas Denny, also one of the founders of the firm.

The larger jobs, such as the Occult Gazette, had meant that the Denny's had needed to outsource the typesetting to St Albans Typesetters in Hertfordshire.

This got the job done, but the finished type had to be collected, and it was a considerable drive to reach St Albans on the road system of the time.

Thus in or , the brothers decided to invest in their own Linotype machine. They had used an old model of this at Tayfen Road, which was soon disposed of, because of its shortcomings.

This later model proved much better. Linotype machines had earned the description "hot metal printing", because the individual letters of type were cast in molten lead as the operator typed in the copy.

In practice a whole line of type would be cast as one "slug". There was no more need to keep cases and cases of type as had been needed in the past, and no more need to carefully replace the letters in the correct case after a print run.

The cast "slugs" were used for the print run, and then returned to the machine to be melted down for the next job. The typesetting machine had been invented in America in the 19th century, but were now built by the Linotype and Machinery Company of Altrincham, founded in This heavyweight monster of a machine needed more floorspace than they had available.

Russell's answer to this was to have the machine winched up to the ceiling, while he built a first floor into the old St Andrew's Hall to accommodate it.

The typesetter was then duly lowered into its new home. Kings Road Corner In the brothers bought the Old Dairy, which was on the corner of Kings Road.

This was adjacent to their premises in St Andrews Hall, and had been a victim of the Zeppelin Raid in which had required its upper floors to be rebuilt.

In fact, the top floor was demolished, and the building repaired as a two storey building, which it remained in , and also to the present day.

Gradually the brothers would acquire as many of the neighbouring properties as came on to the market. In the Denny Brothers partnership installed their first litho press.

This was a Heidelberg Kord, which was one of the first litho presses made by Heidelberg. It was really a traditional style of press converted to work as a litho press, but it soon became a Jack of all Trades at Denny's and in the printing industry in general.

The litho process involved printing from an etched plate rather than printing from a "forme" of individual metal type characters. The litho process had many advantages over letterpress, but the older machines could still cover areas of work unsuited to lithography.

Such new presses were needed in order to keep ahead of the stiff competition from other printers in the town, such as Pawseys, Grooms, Paul and Matthew, and later start-ups like Youngers.

Late in another significant Denny joined the firm. He had achieved the number of exam passes necessary to join a printing course at Norwich City College, and became an apprentice printer.

He had already been printing programmes for school plays and sports events on his own account in the shed at home using the original Harrild Press.

Barry Denny would eventually become Managing Director of the company. By the firm was operating four printing presses.

These were: Two Heidelberg platen presses. Double Crown, "Miehle" type two revolution cylinder press for posters and large jobs.

There was also a Linotype typesetting machine which set lines of type from liquid lead into solid slugs for use on the presses.

Gradually they were also able to buy number 48, number 47 and 46 over the next few years, consolidating a hold upon the block of buildings around the Kings Road corner.

The year proved to be highly significant for the Bury St Edmunds printing firm of Denny Brothers. In the firm was asked by crop science specialist Bayer if it could develop an information leaflet to place on the outside of a product bag, rather than placing it loose inside.

The printing firm developed and then patented the idea and Fix-a-Form was born by the end of the year. Patent protection was vital to prevent other companies from exploiting the Fix-a-Form idea, and to allow the company to invest heavily in the further development of the product.

Before the invention of Fix-a-Form, Denny Brothers were just one of a large number of printing companies offering a variety of printed products to customers.

Now they had a unique product to sell. Kings Road shop Click to see a larger picture and a bearded Barry Denny crossing the road. The people shown are, from left to right: Tom Thorne, by the van.

Vanessa Clarke, by the van. Grace Denny, married to Douglas, and mother of Barry Denny. Unknown Mandy Block Barry Denny, crossing the road.

The sign shows that the firm had entered the market to sell commercial stationery and although this continued to generate profitable business, the Fix-a-Form product would generate the real growth in the company.

Grace Denny would continue to manage the stationery part of the business after the printing work moved out to new premises. She had to contend with increasing levels of competition from larger suppliers.

It was by no means certain that Fix-a-Form would catch on, and so the Denny brothers continued to try developing and producing their own products, one of which was to make sets of playing cards.

Fix a Form logo. After the development of Fix-a-Form, Denny Brothers went all out to exploit the new product, finding new uses and outlets for its use.

However, they realised that in order to exploit overseas markets a new approach was required. Its purpose was to begin the manufacture of the machinery required to produce the new products, so as to license Fix-a-Form's production to other companies abroad, including the supply of the necessary machinery.

The factory in Boby's old building. With the expansion of business the firm was always on the look out for new premises, and in they took out a lease on the old Robert Boby Office block on St Andrews Street, South, in Bury St Edmunds.

This gave much more space to hold the growing printing business and all the associated folding, stapling and glueing equipment needed for the new products.

At around this time it was also decided to try a new venture into the art print market. Some paintings were purchased with the intention of producing art prints for sale to the trade and direct to the public.

Seeking an artistic sounding name for the new project they adopted the maiden name of Barry Denny's grandmother, and Ottewill Art was launched.

A small gallery was created in the St Andrews Street premises to display the works, and members of the public who visited also expressed an interest in obtaining art materials as well.

Thus began the expansion of Ottewill Art into the field of artists' materials and equipment. Over the years this became a growing trade until Ottewill Art became one of the best artist's shops in the region.

The Fasson Awards. In Denny Brothers' Fix-a-Form products received two Fasson Awards for excellence in the field of labelling and packaging.

The awards were for Best Innovation, and Company of the Year. These awards put the Bury St Edmunds printers on the map. Fix-Form had been steadily growing and doing well, but these awards put them on the front pages of trade magazines, giving them access to overseas business as well.

The s now produced a period of rapid growth, with the signing of international licensees, and worldwide sales resulted. The first ever licensee to sign-up was based in South Africa and today there are over 20 companies around the world, manufacturing under licence of their patents, trade marks and know-how.

With the company's growth, and the involvement of other family members, it was decided to convert the business from a partnership into a limited company, now known as Denny Brothers Ltd.

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Contact our commercial sales representative on: Staff in our printing department have extensive digital and reprographic knowledge and expertise.

We produce photo quality prints and canvases up to A0 size and our digital specialists can create and print a range of personalised products, including: business cards, invitations, change of address cards, leaflets, wedding stationery and greetings cards.

Call, email, or drop into our store to get a quote or place an order. All framing is completed in-house in our workshop by our extremely skilled and experienced Fine Art Trade Guild qualified Picture Framers.

As well as bespoke framing, we also offer a mount cutting service, and are stockists of a wealth of ready-made picture frames.

Also located upstairs in our Framing department is a gallery exhibiting the work of local artists, including original paintings, prints, greetings cards and a selection of handmade silver jewellery.

To enquire about exhibiting in our gallery please contact Maureen Denny on: Departments at Denny Bros. Art The team in our Art department are extremely knowledgeable and able to advise extensively on a huge range of merchandise.

An older picture of these premises is shown below at Sample Occult Gazette from Following the move several interesting jobs came along for the firm.

She had founded the School in Kensington in following a career as a medium. She required her followers to give up all their wealth to the School when they entered and required them to address her as Zamiar.

She claimed to receive instructions from her spirit guide "Ra-Men-Ra. Other contracts for work from London would follow this one as Denny's became known for being able to handle such a production.

The Gazette was the size of a tabloid newspaper, and had 16 pages. At this time the brothers used the services of St Albans Typesetters to produce the type on their Linotype machines.

Barry Denny remembers accompanying his father on the evening trips to St Albans to collect the slugs of made-up type, often missing his homework to do so.

In fact, at first the job was so large for the small firm that after they printed the pages, they had to be taken to the family home in Severn Road.

The reason for this was so that as many family members as available would hand fold and then collate the production ready to return the finished magazines to the factory for collection.

In Elisabeth Fraser, an editor and author for Jarrold Publishing, wrote a book called "Fragments", in which she described her life in several cults or sects, the first of which was the School of Universal Philosophy and Healing.

She recorded how one of her jobs after she joined in was to undertake all the typing and mailing connected with the Occult Gazette.

She described how she and her brothers would take turns, every third month, to collect the printed copies of the Gazette from Bury St Edmunds.

One night her mother and her brother James had gone to Bury as usual to collect the magazines. Elisabeth received a telephone call from a witness to say that their car had turned over near Bury, full of magazines, and her mother was injured.

With another brother she left London at All three then went to the hospital to visit their mother. Elisabeth refused to allow doctors to give her mother a lumbar puncture, and she would stay in hospital for six weeks.

James was given a sedative for his shock, but after an hour all three returned to the scene, recovered all but a few magazines, and then returned to London, all before dawn the same day.

There is a legend within Denny Brothers that following this accident, the driver was given a blood transfusion whilst unconscious.

When he later found out about this, he declared that he would die because the sprits were against the giving of blood.

The legend states that he subsequently died, but as seen above, Fraser's account does not support this story. She split with Gladys Spearman-Cook in At first the Occult Gazette was printed four times a year, but was a monthly by It was still being printed in , and may by then have become only bi-monthly issue.

First Heidelberg. In the Brothers purchased their first Heidelberg press. This was the Heidelberg Crown Folio platen model, with automatic feed.

Crown folio was a paper size of 10x15 inches, allowing a larger print area than before. Automatic feeding of the next sheet of paper avoided the need to put each sheet into place by hand.

This still used the old letterpress system and such machines would continue to find a useful life despite the looming advent of litho printing. The "hands off" sign on it shows that modern safety requirements preclude its day to day use nowadays.

The Heidelberg Platen press became the mainstay of British jobbing letterpress printing and many machines still see service today working on jobs that litho or digital machines cannot do, such as odd shapes of stock, numbering, creasing and perforating, for example.

Heidelberg would produce its first litho press in Upon discovering from the firm's representative that these old presses were to be destroyed, Douglas Denny asked if he could buy back the Harrild in order for his son Barry to make use of at home.

Barry was about 13 at the time, and had been brought up with the smell of printers ink and had helped around the business during holidays and after school.

After some discussions the Heidelberg company delivered the press gratis to the Denny home in Severn Road, where it was set up in the shed.

While he was still at the King Edward VI Grammar School Barry Denny undertook the printing of programmes from his shed for many of the school's sports days and school plays.

Denny Brothers St Andrews Street works The photograph shown here is of the St Andrews Street works and shop in Ron Cockle, who worked for Denny Brothers from the age of 15 to retirement at Douglas Denny, also one of the founders of the firm.

The larger jobs, such as the Occult Gazette, had meant that the Denny's had needed to outsource the typesetting to St Albans Typesetters in Hertfordshire.

This got the job done, but the finished type had to be collected, and it was a considerable drive to reach St Albans on the road system of the time.

Thus in or , the brothers decided to invest in their own Linotype machine. They had used an old model of this at Tayfen Road, which was soon disposed of, because of its shortcomings.

This later model proved much better. Linotype machines had earned the description "hot metal printing", because the individual letters of type were cast in molten lead as the operator typed in the copy.

In practice a whole line of type would be cast as one "slug". There was no more need to keep cases and cases of type as had been needed in the past, and no more need to carefully replace the letters in the correct case after a print run.

The cast "slugs" were used for the print run, and then returned to the machine to be melted down for the next job. The typesetting machine had been invented in America in the 19th century, but were now built by the Linotype and Machinery Company of Altrincham, founded in This heavyweight monster of a machine needed more floorspace than they had available.

Russell's answer to this was to have the machine winched up to the ceiling, while he built a first floor into the old St Andrew's Hall to accommodate it.

The typesetter was then duly lowered into its new home. Kings Road Corner In the brothers bought the Old Dairy, which was on the corner of Kings Road.

This was adjacent to their premises in St Andrews Hall, and had been a victim of the Zeppelin Raid in which had required its upper floors to be rebuilt.

In fact, the top floor was demolished, and the building repaired as a two storey building, which it remained in , and also to the present day.

Gradually the brothers would acquire as many of the neighbouring properties as came on to the market. In the Denny Brothers partnership installed their first litho press.

This was a Heidelberg Kord, which was one of the first litho presses made by Heidelberg. It was really a traditional style of press converted to work as a litho press, but it soon became a Jack of all Trades at Denny's and in the printing industry in general.

The litho process involved printing from an etched plate rather than printing from a "forme" of individual metal type characters. The litho process had many advantages over letterpress, but the older machines could still cover areas of work unsuited to lithography.

Such new presses were needed in order to keep ahead of the stiff competition from other printers in the town, such as Pawseys, Grooms, Paul and Matthew, and later start-ups like Youngers.

Late in another significant Denny joined the firm. He had achieved the number of exam passes necessary to join a printing course at Norwich City College, and became an apprentice printer.

He had already been printing programmes for school plays and sports events on his own account in the shed at home using the original Harrild Press. Barry Denny would eventually become Managing Director of the company.

By the firm was operating four printing presses. These were: Two Heidelberg platen presses. Double Crown, "Miehle" type two revolution cylinder press for posters and large jobs.

There was also a Linotype typesetting machine which set lines of type from liquid lead into solid slugs for use on the presses.

Gradually they were also able to buy number 48, number 47 and 46 over the next few years, consolidating a hold upon the block of buildings around the Kings Road corner.

The year proved to be highly significant for the Bury St Edmunds printing firm of Denny Brothers. In the firm was asked by crop science specialist Bayer if it could develop an information leaflet to place on the outside of a product bag, rather than placing it loose inside.

The printing firm developed and then patented the idea and Fix-a-Form was born by the end of the year. Patent protection was vital to prevent other companies from exploiting the Fix-a-Form idea, and to allow the company to invest heavily in the further development of the product.

Before the invention of Fix-a-Form, Denny Brothers were just one of a large number of printing companies offering a variety of printed products to customers.

Now they had a unique product to sell. Kings Road shop Click to see a larger picture and a bearded Barry Denny crossing the road.

The people shown are, from left to right: Tom Thorne, by the van. Vanessa Clarke, by the van. Grace Denny, married to Douglas, and mother of Barry Denny.

Unknown Mandy Block Barry Denny, crossing the road. The sign shows that the firm had entered the market to sell commercial stationery and although this continued to generate profitable business, the Fix-a-Form product would generate the real growth in the company.

Grace Denny would continue to manage the stationery part of the business after the printing work moved out to new premises.

She had to contend with increasing levels of competition from larger suppliers. It was by no means certain that Fix-a-Form would catch on, and so the Denny brothers continued to try developing and producing their own products, one of which was to make sets of playing cards.

Fix a Form logo. After the development of Fix-a-Form, Denny Brothers went all out to exploit the new product, finding new uses and outlets for its use.

However, they realised that in order to exploit overseas markets a new approach was required. Its purpose was to begin the manufacture of the machinery required to produce the new products, so as to license Fix-a-Form's production to other companies abroad, including the supply of the necessary machinery.

The factory in Boby's old building. With the expansion of business the firm was always on the look out for new premises, and in they took out a lease on the old Robert Boby Office block on St Andrews Street, South, in Bury St Edmunds.

This gave much more space to hold the growing printing business and all the associated folding, stapling and glueing equipment needed for the new products.

At around this time it was also decided to try a new venture into the art print market. Some paintings were purchased with the intention of producing art prints for sale to the trade and direct to the public.

Seeking an artistic sounding name for the new project they adopted the maiden name of Barry Denny's grandmother, and Ottewill Art was launched.

A small gallery was created in the St Andrews Street premises to display the works, and members of the public who visited also expressed an interest in obtaining art materials as well.

Thus began the expansion of Ottewill Art into the field of artists' materials and equipment. Over the years this became a growing trade until Ottewill Art became one of the best artist's shops in the region.

The Fasson Awards. In Denny Brothers' Fix-a-Form products received two Fasson Awards for excellence in the field of labelling and packaging.

The awards were for Best Innovation, and Company of the Year. These awards put the Bury St Edmunds printers on the map.

Fix-Form had been steadily growing and doing well, but these awards put them on the front pages of trade magazines, giving them access to overseas business as well.

The s now produced a period of rapid growth, with the signing of international licensees, and worldwide sales resulted. The first ever licensee to sign-up was based in South Africa and today there are over 20 companies around the world, manufacturing under licence of their patents, trade marks and know-how.

With the company's growth, and the involvement of other family members, it was decided to convert the business from a partnership into a limited company, now known as Denny Brothers Ltd.

Mrs Thatcher presents award to Douglas Denny. Mrs Thatcher was in her second term as Prime Minister, and was keen to support family businesses, and wanted to be seen to be involved with Europe.

The occasion was for the presentation of their Anglo-Dutch awards for Enterprise. After some favourable comments about Anglo-Dutch relations at government level, and comments about government deficits, Mrs Thatcher turned to the awards themselves.

A few of her comments are shown here: "Now the Enterprise Award. It is very important because in a free society one relies on the people, the companies of enterprise to produce the standard of living, to produce the goods and the services which the customer wants against the framework of politics which we in Government try to create Now of course I am a great believer in free enterprise, a great admirer of its work, of its sense of adventure, of its attention to good design, of its attention to good financial management, of its attention to the human factor in good management between management and workforce in each and every enterprise.

And I am also a great supporter of small business. It not only adds greatly to employment, it not only adds greatly to prosperity, but the people who embark on new business and small business add greatly to the kind of character and independence of our free society.

Now Sir James has already told us that we are here for the awards and I know you are very anxious, as I am, to know who has won the awards.

You know that there can only be four and I am very pleased that two of them go to small businesses. As an independent membership organisation the NBCC is able to provide small and medium sized companies in Britain, The Netherlands and elsewhere with assistance in expanding their overseas business activities.

Anglo-Dutch Award Luncheon. In May , after receiving an Anglo-Dutch Export Award, presented at a luncheon at the London Hilton Hotel, this picture was taken of representatives of Denny Brothers and business associates.

With the firm now restructured as a limited company, Douglas Denny became Chairman of the company, and his son, Barry Denny was appointed Managing Director.

Both Russell and Douglas now aimed to gradually reduce their workloads while remaining within the company. Mildenhall Road factory. By Denny Brothers had been forced to acquire additional small sites to accomodate their growing business.

This included a small factory at 2 Greyfriars Road. This fragmentation of operations was always a problem, and a search for new premises had always been a priority.

By the company's world wide presence and expanding workloads meant that the factories in Kings Road, Greyfriars Road and St Andrews Street could no longer operate efficiently at these high levels of demand.

There had been a continuing search for new premises, and in a brand new factory was completed at Lamdin Road, on the north side of Bury St Edmunds.

Denny Brothers soon began to use the address of Mildenhall Road, as the factory fronted on to that road, and the name was much better known than Lamdin Road.

The printing presses were removed for the old Boby's Office block in St Andrews Street, and the lease was given up.

All the printing operations were now moved to Mildenhall Road. The firm had been founded 50 years earlier, in , by Douglas and Russell Denny.

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